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Title:IN SITU CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE MOTILE TO SESSILE TRANSITION OF PSEDOMONAS AERUGINOSA COMMUNITIES
Author(s):Cao, Tianyuan
Contributor(s):Bohn, Paul W.; Shrout, Joshua D.; Baig, Nameera F.; Kramer, Kristen M.; Morales-Soto, Nydia
Subject(s):Spectroscopy as an analytical tool
Abstract:\textit{Pseudomonas aeruginosa} is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen which infects more than 50,000 people each year in the United States alone. Its abilities to move, colonize surfaces, and develop biofilms give rise to the high resistance to antimicrobial treatment. One type of motility employed by \textit{P. aeruginosa} is swarming motility, where bacterial cells undergo physical and metabolic alterations. Swarming has been studied by many researchers but the knowledge on its chemical composition that relates to the transition between the motile and sessile biofilm stages are still lack. Here we apply confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) to examine \textit{P. aeruginosa} wild-type PA14 (a virulent strain isolated from a burn wound) under swarming and biofilm conditions. The comparison between the swarming and biofilm samples indicates different molecules linked to the motile to sessile transition, revealing their community-specific chemical features. While the \textit{Pseudomonas} quinolone signal (PQS) is found in swarm colonies and biofilms, the \textit{N}-oxide quinolines (4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline-\textit{N}-oxide,2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline, etc.) are present in higher abundance and are synthesized and secreted much earlier in swarm colonies. Moreover, a closer investigation spanning from the center to the edge of a swarm colony shows high abundance of PQS at the center while \textit{N}-oxides dominate the edge of the colony. The results provide insights into the chemical profile change occurring during the motile to sessile transition in \textit{P. aeruginosa}, and demonstrate the broad application of CRM in biomolecular imaging. \begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0pt} \includegraphics[scale=0.8]{image_file.eps} \end{wrapfigure}
Issue Date:06/21/18
Publisher:International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy
Citation Info:APS
Genre:Conference Paper / Presentation
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/100832
DOI:10.15278/isms.2018.RH08
Other Identifier(s):RH08
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-08-17
2018-12-12


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