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Title:Jazz vibraphone as a chordal instrument: a comprehensive guide to comping and block chord techniques
Author(s):Shaw-Rutschman, Micah
Director of Research:Stephens, John C.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Stephens, John C.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Gray, Larry; Moersch, William; Solis, Gabriel
Department / Program:Music
Discipline:Music
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:A.Mus.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):jazz
vibraphone
vibes
vibraharp
percussion
comping
chord
block chord
locked hands
four-mallet grip
Abstract:Although there are many jazz vibraphone method books available on the market, I have found that they do not cover the full spectrum of concepts that are necessary to play the vibraphone as a chordal or comping instrument within a group setting. Specifically, I found that there is no methodology for improvisation within this context. This dissertation explores chordal concepts that are frequently discussed in piano method books but have not been addressed in-depth in the vibraphone pedagogical materials currently available. An examination of block chord and other pianistic approaches to playing are discussed and applied to vibraphone performance. This includes analyses of solos by notable jazz pianists, including Milt Buckner, George Shearing, Oscar Peterson, Phineas Newborn, Red Garland, and McCoy Tyner. Vibraphone adaptations of these solos are included, as well as exercises and etudes to help demonstrate how these concepts can be used in a real musical context. Stefon Harris's four-mallet grip, which has not been addressed in previous publications, is also discussed in detail. While there are a handful of grips that have been accepted in the percussion community, including the Stevens grip, the Burton grip, and Traditional grip, this dissertation offers an alternative to these techniques that I have found particularly helpful in executing some of the more complex material that is included in this dissertation. This dissertation aims at providing the reader with the necessary skills to both fulfill the role of an accompanimental instrumentalist in a group setting, as well as become versed in the art of chordal improvisation.
Issue Date:2018-04-17
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/100999
Rights Information:Copyright 2018 Micah Shaw-Rutschman
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-09-04
Date Deposited:2018-05


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