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Title:Soybean hulls as a dietary fiber source in canine and feline diets
Author(s):Detweiler, Katelyn B.
Advisor(s):de Godoy, Maria R. C.
Contributor(s):Swanson, Kelly S.; Fahey, George C.
Department / Program:Animal Sciences
Discipline:Animal Sciences
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):soybean hulls, dog, cat, fiber, digestibility
Abstract:Soybean hulls (SBH) are a fiber-rich co-product of the soybean oil extraction process that corresponds to 8% of the soybean seed. Despite being readily available and priced competitively, SBH are underutilized in monogastric nutrition. Therefore, two studies were conducted to evaluate the use of SBH as a dietary fiber in canine and feline diets. Four diets were formulated with either SBH, beet pulp (BP), or cellulose (CL) as the main source of dietary fiber (15% total dietary fiber), with the last diet formulated with no supplemental fiber (NF). All animal procedures were approved by the University of Illinois Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. The studies were replicated 4x4 Latin square designs. Each period consisted of 14 d, with 10 d of diet adaptation followed by 4 d of total fecal and urine collections. At the end of each period, a blood sample was collected and analyzed for serum chemistry. Food was offered twice daily and fed to maintain body weight. In the first study, eight adult female beagles (mean age = 4.6 ± 0.6 yr; mean BW = 12.8 ± 1.7 kg) were used. Food intake (g/d) on a dry matter basis (DMB) did not differ among treatments. Fecal score was lower (P < 0.05) in dogs fed CL (2.0) in contrast with other dietary treatments (mean = 2.3), using a 5-point scale. As-is and DM fecal output did not differ in dogs fed BP, CL, or SBH and values were approximately 50% greater (P < 0.05) than dogs fed NF. Apparent total tract (ATT) dry matter, organic matter, and gross energy digestibilities were greater (P < 0.05) in dogs fed NF when compared to dogs fed BP, CL, or SBH. Dogs fed CL had greater (P < 0.05) ATT fat digestibility (94%) compared with all other treatments (mean = 91%). Dogs fed CL and NF had greater (P < 0.05) ATT crude protein digestibility, 87% and 86%, respectively, while SBH and BP resulted in intermediate (83%) and lower (79%) digestibility coefficients. Fecal total short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration was greatest (P < 0.05) in dogs fed BP (582.5 μmole/g) and SBH (479.7 μmole/g) when compared to NF and CL (267.0 and 251.1 μmole/g, respectively). In the second study, eight adult male cats (mean age = 10.5 yr ± 0.1; mean BW = 6.1 kg ± 0.8 kg) were used. Food intake expressed on a DMB was lower (P < 0.05) in cats fed BP (55.2 g/d) when compared to SBH (70.8). Fecal score was higher (P < 0.05) in cats fed the NF diet (2.8) compared to the three fiber treatments (mean = 2.2) on a 5-point scale. As-is fecal output did not differ in cats fed BP or SBH and, when expressed on a DMB, fecal output did not differ between fiber treatments. Apparent total tract dry matter, organic matter, and gross energy digestibilities were greater (P < 0.05) in cats fed NF when compared to those fed BP, CL, or SBH. Cats fed CL had greater (P < 0.05) ATT crude protein digestibility (89%), while cats fed NF and SBH had intermediate digestibility (85 and 82%, respectively) and those fed BP had the lowest (77%). Cats fed CL had greater ATT fat digestibility (93%) than cats fed BP (87%) and SBH (89%). Total dietary fiber ATT digestibility was lowest in cats fed NF and CL (9 and 15%, respectively), followed by SBH (18%) and cats fed BP having the highest digestibility (33.7%). Total SCFA concentration was greatest in cats fed BP (699.7 μmole/g) when compared to the other three treatments, while phenol and indole concentrations did not differ among treatments. In both animal studies, there were no effects of dietary treatment on serum metabolites and all animals remained healthy throughout the studies. In conclusion, SBH resulted in similar ATT macronutrient digestibilities when compared to BP and CL; fiber sources widely used in commercial pet foods. Therefore, SBH could be a viable dietary fiber source in canine and feline diets.
Issue Date:2018-04-16
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101312
Rights Information:Copyright 2018 Katelyn Detweiler
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-09-04
2020-09-05
Date Deposited:2018-05


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