Library Trends 66 (3) Winter 2018: Information and the Body: Part 1

 

Library Trends 66 (3) Winter 2018: Information and the Body: Part 1. Edited by Andrew M. Cox, Brian Griffin, and Jenna Hartel.

Within library and information science (LIS), the study of information behavior has traditionally focused on documentary sources of information and to some degree information that is shared through interaction.1 Such an emphasis reflects the origins of the whole field in the study of the information behavior of users of libraries and other institutions that provide access to encoded forms of knowledge. Yet the centrality of embodied experience in all aspects of human life makes the relative neglect of the body in information behavior studies surprising and potentially problematic, as a number of authors have suggested (Cox, Griffin, and Hartel 2017; Lueg 2014, 2015; Lloyd 2009, 2010, 2014; Olsson, 2010, 2016). This special double issue of Library Trends on “Information and the Body” brings together researchers interested in embodied information, including in how we receive information through the senses, what the body “knows,” and the way the body is a sign that can be interpreted by others.


Library Trends (ISSN 0024-2594) is an essential tool for librarians and educators alike. Each issue thoroughly explores a current topic of interest in professional librarianship and includes practical applications, thorough analyses, and literature reviews. The journal is published quarterly for the Graduate School of Library and Information Science by The Johns Hopkins University Press. For subscription information, call 800-548-1784 (410-516-6987 outside the U.S. and Canada), email jlorder [at] jhupress.jhu.edu, or visit www.press.jhu.edu/journals.


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  • Day, Ronald (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    This article contrasts Paul Otlet’s epistemology of documents with that of Georges Bataille’s in the late 1920s and early 1930s in regard to the body parts that they assign as sites and analogues for documents. A double ...

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  • Ocepek, Melissa G. (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    Grocery shopping is an everyday activity ideal for exploring how the body impacts information behaviors in the form of sensory-based information sources. Previous information behavior research has largely ignored the body ...

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  • Guzik, Elysia (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    This article works to extend two emerging areas in information scholarship: religious practice and embodiment. By reporting on completed research about information practices among Muslim converts in the Toronto, Ontario, ...

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  • Gorichanaz, Tim (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    There have been many conceptualizations of knowledge in information studies. Though presently disparate, they can be brought together under a common framework with the concept of understanding. As such, understanding can ...

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  • Lindh, Karolina (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    There are many situations in society and life in which the body is expected to play an important role for the acquisition of particular skills. This article reports on a study of such a situation, namely when information ...

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