Library Trends 66 (4) Spring 2018: Information and the Body: Part 2

 

Library Trends 66 (4) Spring 2018: Information and the Body: Part 2. Edited by Andrew M. Cox, Brian Griffin, and Jenna Hartel.

Within library and information science (LIS), the study of information behavior has traditionally focused on documentary sources of information and to some degree information that is shared through interaction.1 Such an emphasis reflects the origins of the whole field in the study of the information behavior of users of libraries and other institutions that provide access to encoded forms of knowledge. Yet the centrality of embodied experience in all aspects of human life makes the relative neglect of the body in information behavior studies surprising and potentially problematic, as a number of authors have suggested (Cox, Griffin, and Hartel 2017; Lueg 2014, 2015; Lloyd 2009, 2010, 2014; Olsson, 2010, 2016). This special double issue of Library Trends on “Information and the Body” brings together researchers interested in embodied information, including in how we receive information through the senses, what the body “knows,” and the way the body is a sign that can be interpreted by others.


Library Trends (ISSN 0024-2594) is an essential tool for librarians and educators alike. Each issue thoroughly explores a current topic of interest in professional librarianship and includes practical applications, thorough analyses, and literature reviews. The journal is published quarterly for the Graduate School of Library and Information Science by The Johns Hopkins University Press. For subscription information, call 800-548-1784 (410-516-6987 outside the U.S. and Canada), email jlorder [at] jhupress.jhu.edu, or visit www.press.jhu.edu/journals.


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  • Fuller, Steve (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    I want to thank Jenna Hartel for inviting me to write the afterword to this set of papers. She is largely responsible—fifteen years ago when I was a visiting professor at UCLA—for introducing me to the rich autonomous ...

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  • Hartel, Jenna (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    What follows is an editorial that makes a case against the development of an empirical research frontier in library and information science (LIS) devoted to information and the body. My goal is to offer a sober and ...

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  • Zhou, Liana H. (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    Alfred C. Kinsey was a biologist turned sex researcher of human sexuality with worldwide acclaim. One of his major achievements was to build a library of sex research materials. Kinsey and his followers have collected not ...

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  • Shankar, Saguna; O'Brien, Heather L.; Absar, Rafa (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    This work explores embodied mobile information practices through a photo-diary and interview study with nineteen smartphone users. We qualitatively analyze 234 diary entries and one hundred descriptions of diary entries ...

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  • Thomson, Leslie (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2018)
    This article introduces the guided tour as an appropriate research technique for studying situated and embodied information. The guided tour hybridizes aspects of observation and interviews, and involves a researcher's ...

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