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Title:Exiled nostalgia and musical remembrance: songs of grief, joy, and tragedy among Iraqi Jews
Author(s):Carrizo, Liliana
Director of Research:Buchanan, Donna A.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Buchanan, Donna A.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Solis, Gabriel; Bashford, Christina; Cuno, Kenneth M.
Department / Program:Music
Discipline:Music
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Affect
Anthropology of Food
Colloquial Arabic (Iraqi)
Cultural exile
Emotion
Gustemology
Individual and Collective Memory
Iraqi women's domestic songs
Maqam
Nostalgia
Nationalism
Synaesthesia
Trauma
Abstract:This dissertation examines a practice of private song-making, one whose existence is often denied, among a small number of amateur Iraqi Jewish singers in Israel. These individuals are among those who abruptly emigrated from Iraq to Israel in the mid twentieth century, and share formative experiences of cultural displacement and trauma. Their songs are in a mixture of colloquial Iraqi dialects of Arabic, set to Arab melodic modes, and employ poetic and musical strategies of obfuscation. I examine how, within intimate, domestic spheres, Iraqi Jews continually negotiate their personal experiences of trauma, grief, joy, and cultural exile through musical and culinary practices associated with their pasts. Engaging with recent advances in trauma theory, I investigate how these individuals utilize poetic and musical strategies to harness the unstable affect associated with trauma, allowing for its bodily embrace. I argue that, through their similar synaesthetic capability, musical and culinary practices converge to allow for powerful, multi-sensorial evocations of past experiences, places, and emotions that are crucial to singers’ self-conceptions in the present day. Though these private songs are rarely practiced by younger generations of Iraqi Jews, they remain an under-the-radar means through which first- and second-generation Iraqi immigrants participate in affective processes of remembering, self-making, and survival.
Issue Date:2018-07-03
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101510
Rights Information:Copyright 2018 Liliana Carrizo
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-09-27
Date Deposited:2018-08


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