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Title:Eating empire, going local: Food, health, and sovereignty on Pohnpei, 1899-1986
Author(s):Levy, Josh
Director of Research:Hoxie, Frederick
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Hoxie, Frederick
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Diaz, Vicente; Hanlon, David; Hoganson, Kristin; Manalansan, Martin
Department / Program:History
Discipline:History
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Food
Pacific
Micronesia
Empire
Indigenous
Indigeneity
Colonialism
Body
Locality
Pohnpei
Caroline Islands
Japan
Germany
United States
Nutrition
Obesity
Abstract:Eating Empire, Going Local centers the island of Pohnpei, Micronesia in a global story of colonial encounter and dietary change. It follows Pohnpeians and Pohnpei’s outer Islanders in their encounters with Spain, Germany, Japan, and the United States, negotiating, adapting to, and resisting empire through food and food production. In the process, Pohnpei extended food’s traditional role as locus of political influence and used it to navigate deceptively transformative interventions in ecology, consumption, the market, and the body. Food became Pohnpei’s middle ground, one that ultimately fostered a sharp rise in rates of non-communicable diseases like diabetes, heart disease, and hypertension. The chapters draw on global commodity histories that converge on the island, of coconuts, rice, imported foods, and breadfruit. These foods illuminate the local and global forces that have delivered public health impacts and new political entanglements to the island. Eating Empire uses food and the analytic lenses it enables – from ecology and race to domesticity and sovereignty – as a tool to reimagine Pohnpei’s historical inter-imperial and contemporary political relationships from the bottom up.
Issue Date:2018-07-13
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101576
Rights Information:Copyright 2018 Josh Levy
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-09-27
Date Deposited:2018-08


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