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Title:Black Power on a City College campus: how Woodrow Wilson junior college became Kennedy-King College
Author(s):Dixon, Fredrick Douglass
Director of Research:Anderson, James D.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Anderson, James D.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Zamani-Gallaher, Eboni Meil; Span, Christopher; Trent, William
Department / Program:Educ Policy, Orgzn & Leadrshp
Discipline:Educational Policy Studies
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Black Community College Campus Movement Black Student Activism Black Power Chicago Politics
Abstract:The scholarly research and writings regarding Black students and student activism on community college campuses remain scarce and at the periphery of the mainstream narrative on student activism. This dissertation will examine one student organization, the Afro-American History Club (AAHC), from Chicago's Woodrow Wilson Junior College (WWJC). I will investigate how their efforts successfully demanded a Black Studies program, hired the institutions first Black administrator and first Black president, and influenced a permanent institutional name change from Woodrow Wilson Junior College to Kennedy-King College. Introducing Black community college students from Chicago as key participants in the expansion of the Black Power Movement furthers new lines of scholarly investigation, which allows a more comprehensive and complex understanding of the Black Campus and Black Power Movements. Additionally, this research aims to inject a new term, the Black Community College Campus Movement (BCCCM) into the dominant discourse on student social movements. This term represents the importance of the efforts and impact of Chicago Black community college students to demand education reform as part and parcel of the 1960s Black Campus Movement, America’s Black Power Movement, and the broader history of global student social movements.
Issue Date:2018-07-11
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101692
Rights Information:Copyright Fredrick Douglass Dixon
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-09-27
2020-09-28
Date Deposited:2018-08


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