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Title:The role of social bonds in understanding the pre- and post-recognition effects of recognition visibility
Author(s):Burke, Joseph
Director of Research:Chen, Clara
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Hecht, Gary
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Mehta, Ravi; Wang, Laura; Williamson, Michael
Department / Program:Accountancy
Discipline:Accountancy
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Accounting
social bonds
recognition
employee recognition
public recognition
Abstract:Although firms extensively use public recognition for high-performing employees, prior academic studies do not find beneficial effects of public recognition (versus private) on employee behavior. I utilize a laboratory experiment to investigate this apparent disconnect by investigating the strength of employee social bonds, and how it moderates the effect of recognition visibility on employees’ pre- and post-recognition behavior. Consistent with prior studies, I find that when weak social bonds exist, public recognition does not result in more beneficial employee behavior than from private recognition. However, when strong social bonds exist, public recognition (versus private) results in greater employee effort to achieve recognition and a more positive response to recognition. Overall, this study offers a potential explanation for the extensive use of public recognition in practice and has implications for the implementation of employee recognition programs – suggesting managers should consider the state of employee relationships before deciding how and where to recognize their employees.
Issue Date:2018-11-29
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102806
Rights Information:Copyright 2018 Joseph Burke
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-02-07
Date Deposited:2018-12


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