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Title:Effects of respondent training on self-report personality assessment: an item response theory approach
Author(s):Zhang, Luyao
Director of Research:Drasgow, Fritz
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Drasgow, Fritz
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Chang, Hua-Hua; Fraley, R Chris; Newman, Daniel; Roberts, Brent; Rounds, James
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Rater training
item response theory (IRT)
self-report personality assessment
the ideal-point model
intermediate items
Abstract:Within the item response theory (IRT) framework and inspired by the rater training literature, this study explored the effects of short online respondent training on personality item interpretation and responding and the number of response categories (i.e. polytomous vs. dichotomous) on item performance, model-data fit, and criterion-related validity. Participants recruited from MTurk (n = 1977) were randomly assigned to 1 of the 4 groups differing in training (i.e. training vs. no training) and response scale (i.e. 4-point Likert scale vs. dichotomous), and their responses to dominance and ideal-point personality measures were analyzed with GGUM, SGR, and 2PL. Results indicated that training was associated with more well-performing and more discriminating and informative intermediate items on the ideal-point scales when a dichotomous response scale was used. The dichotomous scale in general was related to better fit, while criterion-related validity stayed unaffected by both training and the response scale. Participants reported that they had been confused about personality items before, and were positive about the online training, which was consistent with the finding that trained participants on average spent 32 seconds less finishing the ideal-point surveys. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.
Issue Date:2018-11-26
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102913
Rights Information:Copyright 2018 Luyao Zhang
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-02-08
Date Deposited:2018-12


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