Library Trends 65 (4) Spring 2017: Spanning the Information Sciences : A Celebration Marking Seventy Years of the Doctoral Program in the School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Library Trends 65 (4) Spring 2017: Spanning the Information Sciences : A Celebration Marking Seventy Years of the Doctoral Program in the School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Edited by Alistair Black and Emily J.M. Knox.

It is a sad fact that far fewer people survive to celebrate a platinum wedding anniversary (seventy years) than they do a diamond anniversary (sixty years). No doubt that is the main reason why the former is much less well-known than the latter. Thankfully, the marriage of the doctoral program in library and information science to what is now the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois has lasted long enough to achieve platinum status—due to the longevity of both parties, as well as their compatibility. Of course, to wait to celebrate the marriage at the three-quarters-of-a-century mark might have proved even more impactful, but then the opportunity would have been lost to use the platinum anniversary to signal the recent change (2016) of name of the school—now, the School of Information Sciences—as well as the changing complexion of the doctoral program that the change of name partially represents.

The school's adoption of the information sciences rubric is reflected in the great diversity of doctoral studies now undertaken in it. The information sciences spectrum, as Marcia Bates (2015) illustrates, is one of great width, stretching—to cite just a handful of disciplines and subdisciplines—from library science, museum studies, bibliography, archival science, and the sociology of information, to records management, information management, information science, data curation, data analytics, information systems, and informatics. Nowadays, the research interests of the school's doctoral students map fairly closely onto this spectrum, effectively spanning the information sciences—hence the title of this issue of Library Trends.


Library Trends (ISSN 0024-2594) is an essential tool for librarians and educators alike. Each issue thoroughly explores a current topic of interest in professional librarianship and includes practical applications, thorough analyses, and literature reviews. The journal is published quarterly for the Graduate School of Library and Information Science by The Johns Hopkins University Press. For subscription information, call 800-548-1784 (410-516-6987 outside the U.S. and Canada), email jlorder [at] jhupress.jhu.edu, or visit www.press.jhu.edu/journals.

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  • Lawrence, Emily (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2017)
    Is contemporary Reader's Advisory (RA) a purely populist service? In an effort to answer that question, this paper begins with a brief account of the ideological tension between populism and elitism in the library profession. ...

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  • Black, Alistair; Knox, Emily J.M. (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2017)

    It is a sad fact that far fewer people survive to celebrate a platinum wedding anniversary (seventy years) than they do a diamond anniversary (sixty years). No doubt that is the main reason why the former is much less ...

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  • Buck, Margaret H.; Magee, Rachel M. (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2017)
    Young Researchers is a multiyear research project that works with Illinois teenagers to collaboratively develop research and informal learning materials. The project examines how teens interact with science, technology, ...

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  • Witt, Steve (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2017)
    From fears of anarchist terrorists in the early twentieth century through cold war conflict and contemporary fears of extremist religious terrorists, the American library community responded to the use of libraries as a ...

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  • Şerbănuṭă, Claudia (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2017)
    The Romanian communist state constructed a public library system as one of its national propaganda instruments. Within the context that encouraged the development of a public library national system, this paper presents ...

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