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Title:DETECTION OF TRACE AMOUNT OF WATER IN VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY A K-BAND MOLECULAR ROTATIONAL RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY
Author(s):Twagirayezu, Sylvestre
Contributor(s):Neill, Justin L.; Mikhonin, Alex ; Muckle, Matt ; Singh, Sandeep C
Subject(s):Spectroscopy as an analytical tool
Abstract:Trace amount of water has been detected in ethanol (CH$_{3}$CH$_{2}$OH) and methanol (CH$_{3}$OH) using a K-Band BrightSpec Microwave Rotational Resonance (MRR) spectrometer in the 18-26 GHz frequency range. The design of this instrument is based on segmented Chirped Pulse Fourier Transform microwave wave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy, which exploits recent advances in digital electronics to allow fast measurement of broadband rotational spectra of polar molecules. The analysis of the observed rotational spectra reveals the presence of a weak rotational line shape of water due to sensitivity of MRR to polar volatile organic compounds . The capability for K-band MRR to extract water in a such chemical environment has been further examined and validated by spiking samples with known small amount of water. The resulting linear curves allowed the determination of limit of detections at ppm level. These findings suggest that K-band MRR has potential to be useful as a spectroscopic tool for fast detection of water in volatile organic compounds or other raw materials.
Issue Date:2019-06-18
Publisher:International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy
Genre:Conference Paper / Presentation
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/104409
DOI:10.15278/isms.2019.TL03
Rights Information:Copyright 2019 Sylvestre Twagirayezu
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-07-15
2020-01-25


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