Library Trends 67 (3) Winter 2019: Disabled Adults in Libraries

 

Library Trends 67 (3) Winter 2019: Disabled Adults in Libraries. Edited by Jessica Schomberg and Shanna Hollich.

"Disabled" is not a slur. The language of disability is contentious and contested. Institutionally, person-first language such as people with disabilities is often considered a safe choice—at least in the United States (Harpur 2012). However, disability activists who are disabled themselves, as are this issue's editors, often choose identity-first language as a way of claiming our own identities without shame or euphemism (Dunn and Andrews 2015). Throughout this issue, we encourage you to respect the self-labeling choices of those who are members of this community. We also encourage you to seek resources created by disabled people (Brown 2016), and to privilege their language choices over the preferences of nondisabled researchers or caretakers.

Though scholarship about disabilities has been robust in various social science and humanities disciplines for decades, and is increasingly incorporated into applied sciences (Meekosha and Shuttleworth 2009), libraries have been slow to theorize or systematically examine the experiences of dis/ability in libraries (Hill 2013). This special issue will be geared toward the experience of being a disabled adult in libraries. Through a combination of empirical research, reflective papers, and theoretical papers, this issue aims to capture perspectives of and advocate for disabled members of our broad library community—including both workers and patrons.


Library Trends (ISSN 0024-2594) is an essential tool for librarians and educators alike. Each issue thoroughly explores a current topic of interest in professional librarianship and includes practical applications, thorough analyses, and literature reviews. The journal is published quarterly for the Graduate School of Library and Information Science by The Johns Hopkins University Press. For subscription information, call 800-548-1784 (410-516-6987 outside the U.S. and Canada), email jlorder [at] jhupress.jhu.edu, or visit www.press.jhu.edu/journals.

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  • Gibson, Amelia N.; Hanson-Baldauf, Dana (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2019)
    Public libraries are often referred to as community anchors—boundary-spanning institutions (Williams 2002) ideally positioned to inform, empower, and connect citizens in local communities. Despite American Library Association ...

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  • Conley, Sasha; Ferguson, Aaron; Kumbier, Alana (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2019)
    This paper explores methods for building relevant, accessible academic services in the context of a liberal arts college with a growing population of students with psychological disabilities. This work is situated in a ...

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  • Ihekwoaba, Emmanuel Chukwudi; Okwor, Roseline Ngozi; Mole, Austin Jude Chikaodi; Nnadi, Caroline Uchenna (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2019)
    The aim of this paper is to determine access provision for sight-impaired students (SISs) in Nigerian university libraries. This is based on the principle that accessibility to available information in the library is a ...

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  • Pontoriero, Catherine; Zippo-Mazur, Gina (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2019)
    Community college libraries provide many different types of supports on their campuses. Are patrons with disabilities aware of the kinds of support and services a library provides? To answer this question, we created and ...

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  • Williams, Teneka; Hagood, Asha (Johns Hopkins University Press. The School of Information Sciences at Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 2019)
    Diversity is a benchmark that is sought after in workplace organizations as there is a proven correlation between institutional diversity and customer satisfaction (Association of Research Libraries, n.d.). Fulfilling the ...

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