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Title:Memory for actions that are done, imagined, or promised in text
Author(s):Deshaies, Sarah-Elizabeth Marion-Antonia
Advisor(s):Christianson, Kiel
Department / Program:Educational Psychology
Discipline:Educational Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):Memory
Reading
Reading Span
Operation Span
Discourse Processing
Linguistic Processing
Trustworthiness
Abstract:Thinking about an action is sometimes misremembered as doing the action (Garry, Maning, Loftus, & Sherman, 1996). Does this sort of effect hold when people read texts depicting characters thinking about or promising to do actions compared to doing the action? The first experiment asked participants to read vignettes (short stories) that described a character either thinking about doing an action, promising to do an action, or doing that action. Once the vignettes were read, participants were asked about every vignette read, e.g., “Did Monica replace the locks?” Participants then completed an Operation Span and a Reading Span task to measure working memory. The results showed a strong main effect of verb type (Do, Promise, Think) in both accuracy and reading times, with the mean accuracy for the Do condition at 76% correct vs Promise at 40%, and Think at 46% correct. Neither OSPAN nor RSPAN emerged as significant predictors in the models. In the second experiment, participants read similar vignettes that described characters (normed with respect to trustworthiness) either thinking about, promising, or doing an action. The results from experiment two replicated the first experiment with a strong main effect of verb type. However, no main effect of trustworthiness was found. A three-way interaction between the verb type Think, Trustworthiness, and OSPAN was obtained in accuracy. The study results are discussed within models of discourse processing, and memory.
Issue Date:2018-11-05
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/104726
Rights Information:Copyright 2019 Sarah-Elizabeth Deshaies
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-08-23
Date Deposited:2019-05


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