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Title:Literature-based discovery of known and potential new mechanisms for relating the status of cholesterol to the progression of breast cancer
Author(s):Wang, Yu
Advisor(s):Torvik, Vetle I.; Nelson, Erik Russell
Department / Program:Information Sciences
Discipline:Bioinformatics
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):Literature-based discovery
literature review
breast cancer
cholesterol
mechanisms
Abstract:Breast cancer has been studied for a long period of time and from a variety of perspectives in order to understand its pathogeny. The pathogeny of breast cancer can be classified into two groups: hereditary and spontaneous. Although cancer in general is considered a genetic disease, spontaneous factors are responsible for most of the pathogeny of breast cancer. In other words, breast cancer is more likely to be caused and deteriorated by the dysfunction of a physical molecule than be caused by germline mutation directly. Interestingly, cholesterol, as one of those molecules, has been discovered to correlate with breast cancer risk. However, the mechanisms of how cholesterol helps breast cancer progression are not thoroughly understood. As a result, this study aims to study known and discover potential new mechanisms regarding to the correlation of cholesterol and breast cancer progression using literature review and literature-based discovery. The known mechanisms are further classified into four groups: cholesterol membrane content, transport of cholesterol, cholesterol metabolites, and other. The potential mechanisms, which are intended to provide potential new treatments, have been identified and checked for feasibility by an expert.
Issue Date:2019-04-17
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/104825
Rights Information:Copyright 2019 Yu Wang
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-08-23
Date Deposited:2019-05


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