Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfODELL-DISSERTATION-2019.pdf (774kB)Restricted to U of Illinois
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:Victorian literature and historical time: Genre and historicity after Walter Scott
Author(s):O'Dell, Benjamin Daniel
Director of Research:Goodlad, Lauren M.E.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Saville, Julia F.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Underwood, Ted; Bigelow, Gordon
Department / Program:English
Discipline:English
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Victorian
Victorian literature
history
the historical novel
historicity
historical process
George Eliot
Adam Bede
Charles Dickens
Sketches by Boz
Arthur Hugh Clough
Amours de Voyage
Thomas Hardy
The Mayor of Casterbridge
time
temporality
narrative
form
genre
experiment
Georg Lukács
Walter Scott
historical romance
modern
modernity
England
change
changefulness
British
British literature
English literature
the verse novel
sketchbook
serialization
serial
seriality
Abstract:Between the dawn of the nineteenth century and its close, Britain went from a predominantly rural nation with modest territorial holdings to an urban industrial power with an expansive imperial presence. This dissertation, "Victorian Literature and Historical Time: Genre and Historicity after Walter Scott," examines how Victorian writers experimented with literary form to create narrative temporalities capable of negotiating these changes. Georg Lukács famously associated literature's historicity with the realist novel’s ability to capture social movement through typical characters, a narrative form he tied to the historical fiction of Walter Scott. Yet Lukács believed that a reactionary turn after the failed European revolutions of 1848 coincided with an increasing decline in the novel's capacity to depict such historical dynamism. Critics including Ian Duncan, Lauren M.E. Goodlad, Ruth Livesey, Harry E. Shaw and Raymond Williams have since shown the persistence of British literature's historical focus through a variety of inventive forms. This project explores the modes of temporal experience that different literary genres convey. Focusing on Charles Dickens’s Sketches by Boz (1833-6; 1839), Arthur Hugh Clough’s Amours de Voyage (1849; 1858), George Eliot’s Adam Bede (1859), and Thomas Hardy’s Mayor of Casterbridge (1886), it demonstrates how genre-driven temporal experiments capture a sense of historical movement through creative figurations of narrative time.
Issue Date:2019-04-12
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105011
Rights Information:Copyright 2019 Benjamin D. O'Dell
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-08-23
Date Deposited:2019-05


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics