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Title:Thinking outside the box: Extra-parliamentary strategies and their effects on the development of good governance in new democracies
Author(s):Burke, Amanda E.
Director of Research:Skalnik Leff, Carol
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Skalnik Leff, Carol
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Gaines, Brian J.; Sin, Gisela; Winters, Matthew S.
Department / Program:Political Science
Discipline:Political Science
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):democratization, opposition, comparative politics, mixed methods, opposition parties, good governance
Abstract:The literature on transitions and democratization overwhelmingly supports the idea that opposition parties should pursue tactics akin to those used in Westminster and other Western democracies, and those the choice to pursue extra-parliamentary opposition tactics is ultimately anti-democratic. In particular, there is a popular consensus that opposition participation in boycotts prevents the development of democracy. This dissertation takes a critical look at this conjecture, evaluating its plausibility in the first dedicated mixed-methods study of parliamentary and electoral boycotts as extra-parliamentary opposition tactics. I argue that the choice to condemn the use of boycotts takes too narrow a view of the utility of extra-parliamentary tactics in new democracies. I support this claim through the use of case study analysis and dynamic panel data analysis, for which I constructed, using event data, the most extensive dataset on electoral boycotts and the first dataset on legislative boycotts. My findings in both parts show that there is indeed no difference between the likelihood that a country that experiences a boycott and a country which does not will experience good or improved democratic governance, refuting the literature’s current consensus.
Issue Date:2019-04-10
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105169
Rights Information:Copyright 2019 Amanda Burke
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-08-23
Date Deposited:2019-05


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