Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfpaper_57.pdf (666kB)
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:Integrating metaliteracy into knowledge organization curriculum: Designing inclusive curriculum for international classrooms
Author(s):Schuster, Kristen; Stewart, Kristine
Subject(s):Metaliteracy
Learning oriented assessments
Constructive alignment
Abstract:This paper discusses strategies for using Metaliteracy frameworks to design more inclusive and diverse curriculum. Using long term observational research, we will discuss Metaliteracy alongside Constructive Alignment and Learning Oriented Assessment (LOA), two pedagogical models promoted by the Higher Education Academic (HEA) in the United Kingdom (UK). While we recognize the value of each pedagogical model, we argue that they have a significant limitation: They do not acknowledge diverse cultural perspectives on education. Considering the value of diversity in higher education will frame our suggestions for using these models to design more inclusive curriculum. Following our discussion of pedagogical models, we will discuss our case study, which draws on our experiences evaluating a post-graduate course on metadata for cultural heritage organizations titled, From Information to Knowledge. This module is optional and open to all students in the Department of Digital Humanities (DDH) at King’s College London. Despite the challenges inherent to curriculum design, there are models and frameworks that can enhance instructor awareness about when, why and how they evaluate and adjust their course learning outcomes and assessment patterns. We will discuss how frameworks for developing curriculum (like Constructive Alignment) and theories for assessing student learning (like LOA) can enhance how instructors approach conceptualizing literacy and Metaliteracy practices amongst their students. This is particularly important in international and diverse classrooms. Based on our case study we will discuss strategies for facilitating discussion and revision that empowers English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students. We will focus our discussion on an analysis of whether LOA encourages EFL students to practice the critical reflective elements promoted through metacognitive elements in Metaliteracy theories.
Issue Date:2019-09-24
Series/Report:Pedagogy
Students
Information literacy
Specific populations
Metadata
Genre:Conference Paper / Presentation
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105315
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-08-23


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics