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Title:Flexible, stretchable, and transient electronics for integration with the human body
Author(s):Won, Sang M.
Director of Research:Rogers, John A; Bashir, Rashid
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Rogers, John A; Bashir, Rashid
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Li, Xiuling; Cunningham, Brian T; Lyding, Joseph W
Department / Program:Electrical & Computer Eng
Discipline:Electrical & Computer Engr
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):FLEXIBLE ELECTRONICS
STRETCHABLE ELECTRONICS
IMPLANTABLE ELECTRONICS
Abstract:Technologies capable of establishing intimate, long-lived interfaces to the human body have broad utility in continuous measurement of physiological status, with the potential to significantly lower tissue injury and irritation after implants. The development of such soft, biocompatible platforms and integrating them into a biotissue-interfaced system requires suitable choice of materials and engineered structures. Specific directions include overall miniaturization (e.g., Si nanomembrane) or composite material structure (e.g., carbon black doped elastomer) that provide effective mechanics to match those of biological tissues. This dissertation presents combined experimental and theoretical investigations of such functional systems that offer flexibility and stretchability, while maintaining operational performance and mechanical robustness. The dissertation begins with a fundamental study of responsive monocrystalline silicon nanomembrane as a flexible electromechanical sensor element. Subsequent chapters highlight integration with active components for wireless addressing, multiplexing, and local amplification, with multimodal operation in a thin, soft, skin-like platform. The resulting biointegrated system enables (1) sensitive health monitoring system, (2) multifunctional tactile sensor, (3) high-density neural interfaces, and (4) physically transient, implantable electronics, all with the capability of stable operation for long timeframes.
Issue Date:2019-05-29
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105584
Rights Information:Copyright 2019 Sang Won
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-11-26
Date Deposited:2019-08


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