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Title:Impact of plate shape and size on individual food waste in a university dining hall setting
Author(s):Richardson, Rachel McClain
Advisor(s):Ellison, Brenna; Pflugh Prescott, Melissa
Department / Program:Agr & Consumer Economics
Discipline:Agricultural & Applied Econ
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):Food waste
Abstract:With an estimated 50% increase in global food demand by the year 2050 (Campanhola & Pandey, 2019), countries are trying to find ways to increase production and decrease waste to help meet these needs. Young adults (18-24 years of age) have been identified as a high-wasting segment of the population (Thyberg & Tonjes, 2016). In the United States, young adulthood often coincides with the pursuit of postsecondary education. Many students receive housing and meals through the university. Because of this, university dining facilities make an excellent target for food waste reduction strategies. The purpose of this study is to evaluate one food waste reduction strategy: changing the plate size and shape in university dining facilities. Specifically, this study compares individual food selection, consumption, and waste between round plates (9” x 9”) and smaller oval platters (9.75” x 7.75”) in a self-serve, all-you-care-to-eat dining environment. Data was collected at an individual level where diners’ plates were weighed directly after selection and again before disposal. Results suggest using plates with a smaller surface area reduces food selection, consumption, and waste. However, the intervention does increase the odds of a diner selecting seconds, but the amount of waste produced from a second helping could not be measured. Implementing an intervention such as this in many university dining halls may contribute to reducing global food waste among a highly wasteful population.
Issue Date:2019-06-24
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105600
Rights Information:Copyright 2019 Rachel Richardson
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-11-26
Date Deposited:2019-08


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