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Title:The role of executive functioning in risk for depression: A multi-method longitudinal investigation
Author(s):Letkiewicz, Allison M.
Director of Research:Heller, Wendy
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Heller, Wendy
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Berenbaum, Howard; Rudolph, Karen; Hankin, Benjamin; Sutton, Brad
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):depression, depression risk factors, executive function
Abstract:Broad deficits in executive function (EF) are a common finding in clinical depression. Previously considered to be the result of depression, impaired EF is increasingly recognized as a risk factor that has implications for the onset and course of depression. While the developmental literature indicates that EF deficits prospectively predict future depression, prospective work with adults has been limited. The present studies prospectively assessed whether EF deficits predict future depressive symptoms using multiple measures of EF. Study 1 examined relationships between self-reported EF deficits, a task-based measure of updating working memory (WM), and current and future depressive symptoms among adults who were not selected for psychopathology risk. Study 2 examined relationships among self-reported EF deficits, task-based measures of inhibition, shifting, and updating WM, neural activity during an fMRI task that assessed inhibitory functioning, and current and future depressive symptoms among adults who were selected for psychopathology risk. Study 1 found that broad self-reported EF deficits and the task-based measure of updating WM predicted current and future depressive symptoms, although only self-reported shifting predicted future depressive symptoms after controlling for baseline symptoms of depression and anxiety. Study 2 found that broad self-reported EF predicted current and future depressive symptoms, though only self-reported inhibition and WM predicted future depressive symptoms after controlling for baseline symptoms of depression and anxiety. Only task-based inhibition predicted current depressive symptoms, whereas updating WM and a general measure of EF predicted future depressive symptoms. Furthermore, aberrant neural activity for positive stimuli during the fMRI task predicted future depressive symptoms. Results indicate that, among adults, EF deficits confer risk for future depression.
Issue Date:2019-06-21
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105862
Rights Information:Copyright 2019 Allison Letkiewicz
Date Available in IDEALS:2019-11-26
Date Deposited:2019-08


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