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Title:Nobel-Prize-winning papers are significantly more highly-cited but not more disruptive than non-prize-winning counterparts
Author(s):Wei, Chunli; Zhao, Zhenyue; Shi, Dongbo; Li, Jiang
Subject(s):Disruption
Scientific papers
Nobel Prize
Citations
Abstract:Using citation data of 557 Nobel prize winning papers and the same number of their non-prize winning counterparts in the same journal issues, we examined if the prize-winning papers have higher academic disruption than their counterparts. The results show that overall, the former group is significantly more highly-cited but not more disruptive than the latter. Moreover, the results are not consistent with existing knowledge that the numbers of authors and references negatively correlate with the disruption of papers.
Issue Date:2020-03-23
Publisher:iSchools
Series/Report:iConference 2020 Proceedings
Genre:Conference Poster
Type:Text
image
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/106575
Rights Information:Copyright 2020 Chunli Wei, Zhenyue Zhao, Dongbo Shi, and Jiang Li
Date Available in IDEALS:2020-03-17


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