Note:This thesis is part of a research project submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree of Doctor of Musical Arts in the School of Music. The project also involved the preparation and performance of a recital of music related to the thesis topic.

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Title:Salvatore Sciarrino's Sonata No. 5 and its five finales: Analysis and performance practice
Author(s):Ono, Tomoko
Advisor(s):Lund, Erik
Contributor(s):Heiles, William; Taylor, Stephen; Tipei, Sever
Department / Program:School of Music
Discipline:Music
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:A.Mus.D. (doctoral)
Subject(s):Salvatore
Sciarrino
piano
sonatas
analysis
performance practice
Abstract:Salvatore Sciarrino (b. 1947) has composed five piano sonatas to date. V Sonata (1994) is distinctive in that it was composed with an original finale, and four additional optional finales. Sciarrino leaves the decision of which finale to play in a given rendition up to the performer. Sciarrino’s compositional ideas in general, and particularly his piano works, are discussed in order to understand his musical language in depth, and his unique approach to composing for piano. This research demonstrates that Sciarrino continues reusing and developing a collection of motives throughout all of his piano works. The five sonatas were published in a collection in 1997. In addition to sharing motivic material, the ending of each sonata introduces new material that is further developed in the following sonata. V Sonata consists primarily of motives from the previous four sonatas, however, and a new notation Sciarrino creates for a very quiet, percussive, non-pianistic sound, which he calls “minimum intensity.” This study also offers a performance practice guide to V Sonata, including suggestions for fingerings, pedaling, and interpretation. I hope this scholarly essay will give pianists a means to better understand Sciarrino’s piano works in general, and foster interest in performing his piano music.
Issue Date:2020
Publisher:School of Music, College of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Genre:Dissertation / Thesis
Type:Text
Image
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/106960
Rights Information:Copyright 2020 Tomoko Ono
Date Available in IDEALS:2020-04-29


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