Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

video/x-ms-wmv

video/x-ms-wmvmud-to-parks-overview.wmv (7MB)
Mud To Parks - This clip show the whole process in 38 seconds. The other "mud to parks" videos provide more detail.Windows Media video

video/x-ms-wmv

video/x-ms-wmvbarge-loading.wmv (7MB)
Mud To Parks - Mud is excavated from Peoria Lake with a Cable Arm™ clamshell bucket and placed in standard 1500 ton hopper barges for the 168 mile trip to Chicago. It takes about four hours to load a barge.Windows Media video

video/x-ms-wmv

video/x-ms-wmvunloading-barge.wmv (9MB)
Mud To Parks - A crane removed mud from barges in Chicago and placed it in mining trucks that could be used because they remained off-road.Windows Media video

video/x-ms-wmv

video/x-ms-wmvtrucks-view-from-above.wmv (5MB)
Mud To Parks - An elevated view of the mud dropping into the trucks shows its cohesiveness after a week in the barge.Windows Media video

video/x-ms-wmv

video/x-ms-wmvdumping-sediment.wmv (5MB)
Mud To Parks - The mud poured from the trucks and formed cohesive piles that did not require dikes to keep the material from flowing off site.Windows Media video

video/x-ms-wmv

video/x-ms-wmvbulldozing.wmv (8MB)
Mud To Parks - A bulldozer spreads poured mud on the slag field. The tracks leave ruts that aid the drying process. Material is piled up to eight feet high. These clips were shot between April and July. An endloader was used occasionally.Windows Media video

video/x-ms-wmv

video/x-ms-wmvjacksonville-barge-unloading.wmv (15MB)
IL River Project - Fine grained sediment is loaded into a barge from the harbor at Jacksonville, FL for a short trip to a confined disposal facility. Due to the short haul distance, adding water is not an issue and several inches accumulate over the mud. The barge is moved to the CDF site and water is added to thin the material so it will flow across the site rather than accumulate near the pipe. Barges can be unloaded in less than an hour. The consistency of material can be altered by adding water to allow the material to be pumped farther or spread over an area. Note that the discharged material is thicker than that at Tampa and splatters like oil.Windows Media video

video/x-ms-wmv

video/x-ms-wmvtampa_barge_unloading.wmv (12MB)
IL River Project - Fine grained sediment is loaded into a barge from the harbor at Tampa, FL for a short trip to a confined disposal facility. Due to the short haul distance, adding water is not an issue and several inches accumulate over the mud. The barge is moved to the CDF site and more water is added to thin the material so it will flow across the site rather than accumulate near the pipe. Barges can be unloaded in less than an hour. The consistency of material can be altered by adding water to allow the material to be pumped farther or spread over an area. Note this discharge is thinner than that at Jacksonville.Windows Media video

video/x-ms-wmv

video/x-ms-wmvdry-dredge-shallow-water.wmv (5MB)
IL River Project - The Dry Dredge placing sediment in Upper Peoria Lake. The dredge uses a positive displacement pump to move material excavated with an on board clam shell bucket. Among other things, a PD pump could be used to build or elevate islands, create marshes, fill trucks or place material on land.Windows Media video

video/mp4

video/mp4Pekin Landfill - Overview.mp4 (21MB)
Pekin Landfill Project - This video shows entire process including the excavation, handling and placement of mud from Lower Peoria Lake that was taken to the Pekin Landfill in Tazewell County in 2007 to provide topsoil for final cover.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4Pekin Landfill - Loading Barge.mp4 (7MB)
Pekin Landfill Project - This clip shows a Cable Arm clamshell bucket on a crane loading sediment onto a deck barge.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4Pekin Landfill - Loading Trucks.mp4 (6MB)
Pekin Landfill Project - This clip shows mud being loaded into trucks with a clamshell bucket on an excavator.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4Pekin Landfill - Lift Gate Truck.mp4 (4MB)
Pekin Landfill Project - This clip shows mud being dumped from a lift gate semi. The mud inside the truck is visible during the process.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4Pekin Landfill - Truck, End View.mp4 (3MB)
Pekin Landfill Project - This clip shows a flap gate truck dumping mud.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4Pekin Landfill - Truck, Side View.mp4 (6MB)
Pekin Landfill Project - Two trucks in side view dump mud. Note how little sticks to the wheels.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4Pekin Landfill - Dozer.mp4 (4MB)
Pekin Landfill Project - This clip shows a small bulldozer pushing mud over the landfill.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4barge.mp4 (3MB)
IL River Project - A barge load of sediment is loaded onto semi-dump trucks with a 3 cubic yard excavator bucket at Arrow Terminal in Chicago. An end-loader was placed in the barge to assist in removing the last of the dredged material. The water is primarily from a recent rain. The sediment was excavated from Lower Peoria Lake on Sept. 26, and unloaded on Oct. 7, 2003.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4sed_dry_2.mp4 (8MB)
IL River Project - Sediment was taken to the Paxton 1 landfill near Lake Calumet in Chicago. The material was dumped from the trucks and left standing with no further handling. The material dumped from the trucks without problems. It formed pie shaped piles about 2.5 feet high in the center. The sediment in the first truckloads was quite thick.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4sed_wet.mp4 (2MB)
IL River Project - Later truckloads of sediment contained rainwater that was mixed in while unloading the barge. This made the sediment slightly less cohesive than the earlier loads, but it still formed piles.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4endloader.mp4 (3MB)
IL River Project - Sediment dumped from trucks forms uneven piles. An end-loader bucket was used to demonstrate that the sediment is sufficiently cohesive immediately after dumping to be smoothed by a blade. This would provide a relatively even surface after drying that would facilitate planting and cultivating.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4mud_boot.mp4 (2MB)
IL River Project - After several months of drying and weathering, the top several inches of sediment becomes more like typical topsoil. It forms a structure known to soil scientists as granular. This is largely due to drying and freezing and thawing over the winter and to the action of microorganisms. It shows that the sediment is making the transformation from wet mud to fertile topsoil.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4mud_hand.mp4 (2MB)
IL River Project - As sediment dries it goes from a viscous fluid, mud, to a solid, soil. This video shows two handfuls of sediment. The sediment on the right in the initial sequence was about a foot below the surface all winter. It lost considerable moisture, but did not freeze and was not penetrated by oxygen. Its consistency is similar to modeling clay. The material on the left has dried more thoroughly, oxidized, and weathered near the surface for six months. It is granular and well on its way to forming typical soil structure. Soil microorganisms and plant roots will further this process.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4pump_discharge_pile.mp4 (22MB)
IL River Project - Sediment excavated the day before from an Illinois River backwater was pumped by a concrete handling truck with an extended boom. No water was added. The pump easily handled the material that formed piles about two feet high. The boom provides great flexibility in placement options. The pump was operating at about 10% capacity because the available equipment could not feed it faster.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4skidder_to_conveyor_hopper.mp4 (30MB)
IL River Project - A wheeled skidder loaded sediment into the hopper of a truck mounted concrete conveyor. Because the hopper is designed for concrete, the more viscous sediment did not readily flow through the hopper onto the belt. The 40-foot feeder belt pulled the sediment from the hopper and carried it to a transfer point on top of the truck where it fell onto the main 105-foot belt. The belt moves horizontally and vertically providing great flexibility in placement options. Sediment could only be fed into the concrete hopper rapidly enough to operate the conveyor at about 10% of its capacity.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4pump_to_conveyor_hopper.mp4 (25MB)
IL River Project - In this sequence the concrete pump truck placed sediment into the conveyor hopper. The best results were obtained when the pipe was aligned with the center of the belt. The conveyors had no difficulty handling the sediment. The transfer point and belt scrapers worked well.MPEG-4 video

video/mp4

video/mp4Dry_Dredge_4.mp4 (3MB)
IL River Project - The Dry Dredge (TM) uses a small clamshell bucket and concrete pump to move high solids sediment through a pipe. It is shown here operating on Upper Peoria Lake in Illinois. The dredge operated in two feet of water. On this demonstration project it filled geotextile tubes and built a small island.MPEG-4 video

Description

Title:Mud To Parks Videos
Author(s):Marlin, John
Subject(s):mud to parks
sediment
brownfields
Beneficial use of sediment
River sediment
Landscaping
Agricultural soils
Dredged soil
Abstract:Mud to Parks Videos - These video clips show the handling of sediment from the Illinois River's Peoria Lake where it was excavated and loaded into barges to the unloading in Chicago and placement on the site. The clips illustrate the consistency and handling quality of the sediment throughout the process. The mud will provide topsoil for the slag field at the old US Steel South Works site that will become a city park. -- Illinois River Project Videos - The initial phases of the Illinois River Ecosystem Restoration Project include studies of sediment and its handling characteristics and potential use as topsoil. These video clips are from a number of demonstration projects and work sites. -- Pekin Landfill Project Videos - In 2007, mud from Lower Peoria Lake that was taken to the Pekin Landfill in Tazewell County to provide topsoil for final cover. The project was on a smaller scale than the Chicago US Steel site project and used deck barges and over the road trucks. These clips show handling characteristics of mud that has been out of the water on a barge from a few hours to two days. The Overview shows entire process including the excavation, handling and placement. The other videos clips show individual steps, sometimes in more detail. --
Issue Date:2004
Series/Report:Mud to Parks Project
Genre:Other
Type:Video
Language:English
URI:https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBCBPVHKoeNfV6owyTtmE2araA_scn3mv
https://youtu.be/MavNYUcpVg0
https://youtu.be/vYU7bQHO1J4
https://youtu.be/udB0gMK3ZRA
https://youtu.be/O5pR-uEwQxE
https://youtu.be/xNHxizqInK4
https://youtu.be/Ghgxl4x9144
https://youtu.be/Fz23C5F8z5s
https://youtu.be/sVcQFgPu4SE
https://youtu.be/48JVkamCsnc
https://youtu.be/ugoagwmHR6A
https://youtu.be/UwIlWYyN8dc
https://youtu.be/utbu_EMYEVY
https://youtu.be/rKZ5bOF8mEE
https://youtu.be/z4wOKg7WoMs
https://youtu.be/9qBIkAffwnk
https://youtu.be/NBLTHQfvxQ8
https://youtu.be/koJU1LdPPxs
https://youtu.be/et543sXfq1I
https://youtu.be/EibB3FyZDO8
https://youtu.be/dxhhmtyHt5I
https://youtu.be/Fi0G8nKjfzc
https://youtu.be/MG9UEL5zxXU
https://youtu.be/FDZh7JhPK2Q
https://youtu.be/ek8sLof5Vhc
https://youtu.be/TzXwrNBO2Y4
https://youtu.be/ON7umygrQZI
http://hdl.handle.net/2142/107169
Date Available in IDEALS:2020-05-20


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