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Title:A case study of the Black History 101 Mobile Museum’s impact on preservice teachers’ perceptions of the use of artifacts to teach culturally relevant content
Author(s):Bell, Stanley
Director of Research:Hetrick, Laura
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Willis, Arlette
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Frankenberg, Susan; McNair Barnett, Bernice
Department / Program:Curriculum and Instruction
Discipline:Curriculum and Instruction
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Black history
Black museums
mobile museums
Abstract:Utilizing a theoretical framework grounded in critical race theory and culturally relevant pedagogy, the purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the perceptions of preservice teachers (in a four-year university) regarding their beliefs about the importance of teaching Black history. The primary issue addressed in this study was how preservice teachers perceived their readiness to teach culturally relevant content, Black history in particular. The study was based on presurvey questions, survey, and semi-structured interviews with a focus on such teachers’ reflections on their experience of this topic in general as well as when they visited the Black History 101 Mobile Museum. The results of this study indicated that while the participants had some knowledge about how to teach culturally relevant content, their visit to the Black History 101 Mobile Museum showed them that there was still much to learn. Viewing the artifacts from the Black History 101 Mobile Museum exposed the preservice teachers to Black history in a way that could improve their ability to successfully teach such culturally relevant content in the classroom and consider using the artifacts they saw in their own teaching as well. Further studies on this topic should explore more ideas on how to promote Black history in the field of education. Teacher preparation programs are critical in ensuring that teachers feel confident and well-equipped to teach culturally relevant content to their students. Therefore, more case studies about current programs with a focus on Black history should be conducted. Specifically, the insights and reflections that can be gained from qualitative interviews with Black history advocates and educators in established programs could be an asset to the field of education.
Issue Date:2020-05-08
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/108334
Rights Information:Copyright 2020 Stanley Bell
Date Available in IDEALS:2020-08-27
Date Deposited:2020-05


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