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Title:Group conflict and intergroup contact
Author(s):Grady, Christopher D.
Director of Research:Kuklinski, James H; Bowers, Jake
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Kuklinski, James H; Bowers, Jake
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Wong, Cara; Rhodes, Justin
Department / Program:Political Science
Discipline:Political Science
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Group conflict, intergroup contact, Nigeria, field experiment, lab experiment
Abstract:This dissertation contains three papers. The first paper studies the effects of a peacebuilding intervention randomly assigned to conflicting farming and pastoral communities in Nigeria, where thousands die each year in farmer-pastoralist violence. Members of conflicting farming and pastoral groups worked together to build infrastructure projects beneficial to both communities, and that collaboration increased voluntary intergroup contact, intergroup trust, and feelings of security for the participants and for nonparticipants living in the same villages as the participants. The second paper uses a lab experiment to test a specific mechanism through which contact might work. Subjects vicariously experienced intergroup contact that either achieved or failed to achieve a joint goal. It finds that contact only improves attitudes towards the outgroup when it achieves a goal and that contact only improves attitudes of the majority group towards the minority group, not of the minority towards the majority group. The third paper bridges perspectives on group conflict in political economy and political psychology. The political economy literature focuses on bargaining; the political psychology literature focuses on group identities. This paper demonstrates that these two perspectives can work together by applying the group identity perspective to the bargaining perspective, showing how group identities and related psychological and cognitive biases complicate bargaining.
Issue Date:2020-07-14
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/108481
Rights Information:2020 by Christopher D. Grady. All rights reserved.
Date Available in IDEALS:2020-10-07
Date Deposited:2020-08


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