Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfBANKS-THESIS-2020.pdf (585kB)
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:Effects of oral delta-9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) administration on motor activity and anxiety-like behavior in adolescent and adult Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes
Author(s):Banks, Asia
Advisor(s):Gulley, Joshua
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):THC administration
Abstract:Cannabis is one of the most commonly used recreational drugs among adolescents and young adults. Exposure to cannabis and its primary psychoactive component delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) may induce modifications in neural circuitry that in turn lead to adverse consequences on behavior. Previous literature has suggested that intraperitoneal, intragastric, or subcutaneous administration of THC may produce an anxiogenic effect and reduce locomotor activity in rats, but it is unclear if this also occurs following volitional, oral intake of THC. Here, we used adolescent and adult rats of both sexes to determine if oral THC would alter locomotor activity in an open-field arena (OFA) and anxiety-like behavior on an elevated plus maze (EPM). Subjects received vehicle- or THC-impregnated crackers (3.0, 5.0, and 10.0 mg/kg) starting on either P35-37 for adolescent-onset groups or P79-81 for adult-onset groups 90 min prior to each behavioral test. Our data suggests that THC induced a dose-dependent decrease in locomotor activity in the OFA. Additionally, drug-treated animals differed in time spent in the open arms in the EPM, however these results were not statistically significant. These locomotor effects appear to be dependent on both age and sex, as adult males exhibited a relatively greater sensitivity to the effects of THC compared to adult females. Furthermore, these results suggest that rats will voluntarily consume THC-laced crackers at doses that influence locomotor activity and anxiety-related behavior.
Issue Date:2020-07-24
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/108546
Rights Information:Copyright 2020 Asia Banks
Date Available in IDEALS:2020-10-07
Date Deposited:2020-08


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics