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Title:Spatiotemporal excitation sequence manipulation and processing for Doppler ultrasound and pulse-echo sound speed imaging applications
Author(s):Podkowa, Anthony S
Director of Research:Oelze, Michael L
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Oelze, Michael L
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Anastasio, Mark; Insana, Michael; Song, Pengfei
Department / Program:Electrical & Computer Eng
Discipline:Electrical & Computer Engr
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Pulse-Echo Sound Speed Imaging
Doppler Ultrasound
Color Flow
Abstract:Over the past several decades, plane wave based ultrasonic imaging applications have dominated the research landscape in biomedical ultrasonography. This is predominantly due to the inherent advantages of coherent plane wave compounding, in which steered plane waves are coherently summed to generate high resolution images with relatively few transmissions, allowing for high frame rate acquisition. However, the vast majority of the research in plane wave based methods neglects the utility of the individually steered plane wave frames. In this work, two novel applications of these frames are developed. The first is a novel application of these frames to extend the maximum detectable velocity in pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound. This is achieved by a reordering of the frames to minimize the relative phase difference between them while preserving spatial resolution that could be expected using a traditional sequence. The second application, and arguably the more interesting one, is a novel method of exploiting phase differences along different ultrasonic paths to reconstruct maps of local sound speed variations. The majority of this dissertation work will be directed at characterizing this method as well as analyzing the various failure modes associated with it.
Issue Date:2020-07-15
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/108700
Rights Information:© 2020 Anthony S. Podkowa
Date Available in IDEALS:2020-10-07
Date Deposited:2020-08


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