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Title:Immobilization of chlorite dismutase for continuous treatment of chlorite in water systems
Author(s):Vega, Marcela
Subject(s):chlorite
road salt
deicing
toxicity
Abstract:Presented by: Marcela Vega – Post-doc at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Co-authors: Jeremy Guest, Julie Zilles Abstract: Chlorite is a drinking water contaminant produced as a disinfection by-product and an intermediate in the degradation of another contaminant, perchlorate. This work investigates chlorite degradation into innocuous chloride and oxygen catalyzed by the enzyme chlorite dismutase (Cld). Biocatalysis is an emerging technology, with advantages such as operation in milder conditions, high selectivity and low environmental and physiological toxicity. However, immobilization of biocatalysts is needed to reduce treatment costs. Here we studied the activity and longevity of a strep-tagged Cld immobilized in a resin column. Chlorite dismutation was monitored with ion chromatography, and Cld was indirectly measured through heme content. The immobilized Cld retained activity. Column experiments were performed at room temperature at two influent concentrations of chlorite (1 and 5 mg/L) and three concentrations of Cld, resulting in loadings of 0.33, 1.65 and 16.47 µmol chlorite/µmol heme/min. Chlorite was completely removed for as long as 35 days, the maximum operational time tested. These results show that immobilized Cld is capable of removing chlorite at high flow rates and realistic loading rates, and that Cld is stable for long periods of time, as is needed in water treatment technologies. Biography: Marcela is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Crop Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign working on biocatalysis of chlorite/perchlorate. In 2019, Marcela earned a PhD in environmental engineering at Universidad Católica de Chile and University of Notre Dame. Before, Marcela obtained a bachelor and master’s degrees in biotechnology and chemical engineering, respectively, from Universidad de Chile and worked in Teach for Chile for three years.
Issue Date:2021-04-28
Series/Report:2021 Emerging Contaminants in the Environment Conference (ECEC21)
Genre:Presentation / Lecture / Speech
Conference Paper / Presentation
Type:Text
Image
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/109893
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-04-26


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