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Title:Trusted CI webinar: Arizona State's Science DMZ
Author(s):Jennewein, Douglas; Kurtz, Chris
Subject(s):Trusted CI
NSF
Webinar
Science DMZ
Arizona State University
Abstract:Drawing upon its mission to enable access to discovery and scholarship, Arizona State University is deploying an advanced research network employing the Science DMZ architecture. While advancing knowledge of managing 21st-century cyberinfrastructure in a large public research university, this project also advances how network cyberinfrastructure supports research and education in science, engineering, and health. Replacing existing edge network equipment and installing an optimized, tuned Data Transfer Node provides a friction-free wide area network path and streamlined research data movement. A strict router access control list and intrusion detection system provide security within the Science DMZ, and end-to-end network performance measurement via perfSONAR guards against issues such as packet loss. Recognizing that the operation of the Science DMZ must not compromise the university’s network security profile, while at the same time avoiding the performance penalty associated with perimeter firewall devices, data access and transfer services will be protected by access control lists on the Science DMZ border router as well as host-level security measures. Additionally, the system architecture employs the anti-IP spoofing tool Spoofer, the Intrusion Detection System (IDS) Zeek, data-sharing honeypot tool STINGAR, traditional honeypot/darknet/tarpit tools, as well as other open-source software. Finally, Science data flows are supported by a process incorporating user engagement, iterative technical improvements, training, documentation, and follow-up. Speaker Bios: Douglas Jennewein is Senior Director for Research Computing in the Research Technology Office at Arizona State University. He has supported computational and data-enabled science since 2003 when he built his first supercomputer from a collection of surplus-bound PCs. He currently architects, funds, and deploys research cyberinfrastructure including advanced networks, supercomputers, and big data archives. He has also served on the NSF XSEDE Campus Champions Leadership Team since 2016 and has chaired that group since 2020. Jennewein is a certified Software Carpentry instructor and has successfully directed cyberinfrastructure projects funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the US Department of Agriculture totaling over $4M. Chris Kurtz is the Senior Systems Architect for the Research Technology Office in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise at Arizona State University. Previously Chris was the Director of Public Cloud Engineering as well as the Splunk System Architect (and Evangelist) at ASU. He has been appointed as Splunk Trust Community MVP since its inception. Chris is a regular speaker on Splunk and Higher Education, including multiple presentations at Educause, Educause Security Professionals, and Splunk’s yearly “.conf" Conference. Prior to architecting Splunk, he was the Systems Manager of the Mars Space Flight Facility at ASU, a NASA/JPL funded research group, where he supported numerous Mars Missions including TES, THEMIS, and the Spirit and Opportunity Rovers. Chris lives in Mesa, Arizona along with his wife, rescue dogs, and cat.
Issue Date:2021-04-26
Genre:Presentation / Lecture / Speech
Type:Text
Image
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/109914
Sponsor:NSF Grant # 1920430
NSF Grant # 2018886
Rights Information:Copyright © 2021 The Trustees of Indiana University. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-­NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY­NC 3.0) license.
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-04-26


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