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Title:An Overview of the Life, Extinction, and Possible De-Extinction of Mammuthus Primigenius
Author(s):Benjamin Garrett
Subject(s):biology
genetics
Abstract:Mammuthus primigenius, commonly known as the woolly mammoth, was an herbivorous mammal that lived during the late Pleistocene, early Holocene eras, and went extinct 3,700 years ago on Wrangel Island. The objective of this paper is to understand how the woolly mammoth species lived, as well as the factors that led to its extinction. This paper also looks to review some of the research projects that are currently in effect to bring the species back from extinction. During its time alive, woolly mammoth species were once plentiful and found everywhere throughout the northern hemisphere. But due to climate change, overhunting by our early human ancestors, and mutational meltdown, the species went extinct. There are numerous research projects currently in place that aim to bring the species back. The idea of reintroducing an extinct species back into the ecosystem brings up a debate of ethics. Some argue that we have an obligation since we were a cause of its extinction, while others argue that we should not play God and that there will be unforeseen consequences. No research project has produced a successful result, but with many advances in the genetics field, it is certainly a possibility that we could once again have a woolly mammoth roaming the Earth.
Issue Date:2020-12-05
Genre:Article
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/109934
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-05-04


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