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Title:Functional particles for controlled release and cell surface engineering
Author(s):Hong, Yu-Tong
Director of Research:Kong, Hyunjoon
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Kong, Hyunjoon
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Kraft, Mary L; Rogers, Simon A; Boppart, Marni
Department / Program:Chemical & Biomolecular Engr
Discipline:Chemical Engineering
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Nanoparticle
Stem Cell Engineering
Controlled Release, Surface Modification
Biological Gel
Abstract:Engineered polymer vesicles (polymersome) have emerged as the new generation of molecular and cell carriers for a series of biomedical applications. These polymer vesicles typically present as hollow spheres that contain a hydrophilic core surrounded by a hydrophobic membrane, each of which can be loaded with a wide array of small and large molecules of interest. With the capacity to engineer and compartmentalize the properties of these particles, they can be tailored with unique design specifics to meet different applications. In this regard, the overall goal of my thesis research is to construct a functional polymersome system by implementing stimuli-responsiveness and surface modification to overcome various biological challenges. Chapter 2 demonstrates a stimuli-responsive particle with an enhanced release profile as a new formulation pathway to assemble the hemostatic fibrin-based matrix. Chapter 3 presents a polymersome-based cell adherent nanostimulator for enhanced stem cell paracrine factor secretion. I further demonstrated applications of these particle platforms in the treatment of hindlimb ischemia associate with chronic kidney disease (Chapter 4) and the delivery of CD44-binding particles for enhanced retention in aged mice associated with Alzheimer’s disease (Chapter 5). Overall, these studies present a deeper understanding of how to incorporate engineering strategies to construct functional hemostatic gelators and nanostimulator to enhance the biological efficacy of molecular and cell therapies.
Issue Date:2021-04-19
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/110815
Rights Information:Permission not required
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-09-17
Date Deposited:2021-05


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