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Title:High temperature vacuum axial fatigue testing machine
Author(s):Stephens, R.I.; Sinclair, G.M.
Subject(s):Fatigue Testing
Abstract:This paper describes fatigue equipment which was developed to test thin-walled refractory metal specimens in a vacuum under repeated axial loading at temperatures up to 2100°F. The machine is of the constant displacement type and incorporates an eccentric and crank mechanism which allows the alternating stress, mean stress, and frequency of cycling to be varied. The stresses in the specimens are easily calculated from σ = P/A, where P is the axial load measured by a ring dynamometer and A is the cross-sectional area of the specimen. The test specimen is uniquely heated by placing a tungsten heating element inside the thin-walled tubular specimens. The evacuated test chamber is completely visible through the use of a pyrex bell jar seated on an O-ring seal. Axial motion is transmitted into the vacuum chamber through a copper alloy bellows. Preliminary results of fatigue tests on commercially pure arc-cast molybdenum specimens subjected to fully reversed stresses at 1700°F and 875 cpm, are included in this paper.
Issue Date:1960-03
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 160
1967-0456
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/111869
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:Atomic Energy Commission, Contract No. AT (11-1)-67, Project 20
Rights Information:Copyright 1960 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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