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Title:Effect of loading sequence on cumulative fatigue damage of 7075 T6 aluminum alloy
Author(s):Spitzer, Robert; Corten, H.T.
Subject(s):Loading Sequence
Fatigue Damage
Aluminum
Abstract:For conditions of fluctuating stress amplitude consisting of repeated block of cycles of two stress amplitudes and continuously varying amplitudes, it has been shown that the mean fatigue life may be predicted using the linear summation of cycle ratios hypothesis and a “modified σ-N relation.” This approach assumes that the initial sequence of high, intermediate and low stresses does not significantly influence the fatigue life since, in general, the number of cycles in each repeated block is small compared to the life of the member. Recent studies by Naumann and Hardrath suggest however, that the sequence of applying high, intermediate and low stresses in repeated block experiments may change the fatigue life by a factor of from 2 to 4. This investigation was undertaken to clarify this question. It was found that changing the sequence from high followed by low stresses to low followed by high stresses in each repeated block did not change the life by more than the length on one repeated block of cycles, or by a factor of from 1.07 to 1.14.
Issue Date:1961-06
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 193
1967-0489
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/111905
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1961 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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