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Title:Application of linear hardening plasticity theory to cycle and path dependent strain accumulation
Author(s):Schwiebert, P.D.; Moyar, G.J.
Subject(s):Linear Hardening Plasticity Theory
Strain Accumulation
Abstract:This paper is a combination of four distinct but closely related topics. The first is a documentation of the existence of cycle and path dependent plastic deformation. The second is a resume of existing plasticity theories to determine if any existing theory in the realm of mechanics of solids can include the observed phenomenon. The third and essentially original section involves the specialization of an existing theory of inelastic deformation. Included is a discussion of the nature of the specialized theory from a plasticity viewpoint and the application of the theory to a particular complex cyclic stress history. Equations are developed that predict, as a function of cycles, the plastic strain accumulation under conditions of constant axial stress and alternating shear stress in a thin wall tube. The fourth topic is a discussion of present experimental results in the light of theoretical applicability and suggested modifications to include a greater range of material behavior.
Issue Date:1962-01
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 212
1967-0508
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/111927
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1962 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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