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Title:Analytical aspects of crack stress field problems
Author(s):Irwin, George R.
Subject(s):Crack Stress
Abstract:Among procedures for solving linear elastic crack stress field problems the semi-inverse method using a single stress function is of outstanding importance. This method permits illustration and discussion of the basic analytical aspects of linear elastic fracture mechanics with a minimum of mathematical complexity. In addition solutions obtained in this way for simple two-dimensional problems can be used to assist solution of complex two-dimensional crack problems for non-isotropic as well as isotropic elastic solids. The crack-extension force concept is established in terms of two-dimensional considerations. Study of the flat elliptical crack problem reveals the two-dimensional crack-extension force concept remains applicable because, for linear elasticity, the crack border stresses and displacements correspond to plane strain. For finite plate two-dimensional crack problems function type solutions are seldom possible. Numerical results for normal crack at the free boundary of a semi-infinite solid can be obtained from integral equations established directly from physical aspects of the problem. The method illustrated by this example can be employed to solve other more complex problems.
Issue Date:1962-03
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 213
1967-0509
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/111928
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1962 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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