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Title:Influence of temperature and strain rate on crack toughness of mild steel
Author(s):Shoemaker, Alan Kent
Subject(s):Temperature
Strain Rate
Crack Toughness
Steel
Abstract:The purpose of this report is to show, using fracture mechanics concepts, that the crack toughness values of a low carbon steel (four mild steels are examined in this report) vary according to parameter which predicts the yield point for different combinations of temperature and strain rate. The analysis shows that the governing factor controlling the change in KIC* is the change in plastic zone size at the crack tip which changes with yield point. The yield point is controlled by the temperature and strain rate in the form of a parameter, T ln A/ ϵ ̇. Data from notched plate specimens and Krafft’s and Sullivan’s data on notched round specimens (26) indicated that KIC* is a single valued function of the parameter T ln A/ ϵ ̇. KIC* values decreased with a decrease in temperature and an increase in strain rate. Although a rigorous analytical treatment is not available at this time, the data substantiate the dependence of KIC* values on the parameter T ln A/ ϵ ̇.
Issue Date:1962-11
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 235
1967-0531
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/111953
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:Department of the Army, Project No. 59901007, U.S. Army Research Office (Durham), Project No. 3216-MC, Grant No. DA-ARO(D)-31-124-G148
Rights Information:Copyright 1962 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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