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Title:Dislocation arrangements in aluminum deformed by repeated tensile stresses
Author(s):Feltner, Charles E.
Subject(s):Dislocation
Aluminum
Stress
Abstract:Transmission electron microscopy is used to study the dislocation arrangements formed in aluminum at 78° and 300°K by the action of repeated tensile stresses. Although a pronounced macroscopic cyclic stress induced creep effect is observed, the dislocation pattern formed on the first cycle at 78°K is not grossly altered by the subsequent cycling. The dislocation density and cell size undergo a slight increase and decrease, respectively. Contrary to published results on the fatigue of aluminum under reversed stresses, the dislocation loop density in aluminum deformed by a repeated tensile stress is not significantly larger than the loop density produced by unidirectional straining. The present information and additional results on the effect of cyclic straining on the low yield temperature phenomenon in FCC metals support a mechanism based on point deflect-dislocation interaction as a satisfactory explanation for cyclic stress induced creep.
Issue Date:1962-11
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 236
1967-0532
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/111954
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:Aeronautical Systems Division, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Contract No. AF 33(616)-8177
Rights Information:Copyright 1962 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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