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Title:Enhanced grain boundary sliding during reversed creep of lead
Author(s):Kitagawa, Masaki
Subject(s):Grain Boundary Sliding
Creep
Lead
Abstract:Chemical lead is subjected to multiple creep stress reversals at room temperature, 100 C and 150 C, and the alterations in grain structure are examined. Creep deformation resistance at these test temperatures decreases significantly under multiple stress reversals. However, the decrease in creep resistance caused by reversed stressing is smaller when the test temperature is increased above about half of the melting point of the metal. Significant microstructural changes are observed during reversed creep. Grain boundaries are found to migrate toward planes of maximum shear stress, resulting in an orthorhombic grain structure. The formation of this unusual grain structure is discussed in relation to creep resistance changes due to reversed stressing. To support the discussion, grain boundary sliding during reversed creep was measured. The contribution of grain boundary sliding to the total creep strain is found to greatly increase as the orthorhombic grain structure is formed.
Issue Date:1968-10
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 319
1968-0375
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112045
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center, Research Grant NGR 14-005-025
Rights Information:Copyright 1968 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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