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Title:Creep deformation behavior of metals under repeated stress reversals
Author(s):Kitagawa, Masaki; Morrow, JoDean
Subject(s):Creep
Deformation Behavior
Stress
Abstract:Reversed creep tests on chemical lead, 1100-F aluminum and OFHC copper were conducted and creep deformation behavior under repeated stress reversals was studied. Metallographic observations were also made to determine the nature of the structural alteration accompanying reversed creep deformation. It is shown that the creep deformation resistance of a variety of metals is reduced by repeated reversed deformation at temperatures above 0.4Tm, where Tm is the absolute melting temperature of each metal. The reduction of creep deformation resistance due to stress reversals is most prominent at approximately 0.5Tm, and it is of a persistent nature. Metallographic studies show that the observed acceleration of creep at high temperatures is in part due to the enhancement of grain boundary sliding as a result of gradual grain boundary migration toward planes of maximum shear stress during reversed creep deformation.
Issue Date:1971-06
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 342
1971-6006
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112068
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center, Research Grant NGR-14-005-025, 71/06
Rights Information:Copyright 1971 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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