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Title:Comparison of thermal stress developed in s plate straight plate and deep dish wheels
Author(s):Wetenkamp, H. R.
Subject(s):Mechanics
Engineering
Abstract:Heating of the rim of a wheel by brake shoes causes a deformation of the wheel which can result in an axial movement of the rim of the wheel relative to the hub of the wheel and a change in the size of the wheel hub. Five different design wheels were examined by subjecting the wheels to braking cycles in a railway wheel dynamometer. The five design wheels were further examined by a theoretical analysis which permitted the determination of displacements and stresses developed in the wheels by given thermal loads. The results indicate the two “S” plate wheels experienced little axial rim movement compared to the deep dish design wheel. However, the stresses developed in the “S” plate wheels were substantially higher than those determined in the other wheels. The straight plate wheels also developed larger and less desirable types of stresses than the deep dish wheel. The “S” plate wheels and the offset straight plate wheel all tightened on their axels after testing. It is believed that the “S” plate and straight plate wheels as herein examined are not desirable designs.
Issue Date:1972-07
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 359
1972-6007
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112087
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:Griffin Wheel Company, Chicago, IL, 72/07
Rights Information:Copyright 1972 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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