Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfTAM404-UILU-ENG-1975-6007.pdf (8MB)
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:Pulse propagation in fluid-filled tubes
Author(s):Walker, J.S.; Phillips, J.W.
Subject(s):Pulse Propogation
Fluid-filled Tubes
Pressure Pulses
Axial Impulsive Force
Abstract:A new theory for the propagation of pressure pulses in an inviscid compressible fluid contained in a thin-walled elastic tube is presented. This theory represents an improvement over the classical waterhammer theory because the restriction that the speed of sound in the tube material must be much greater than that in the fluid has been removed and because the restriction that the pulse length must be much greater than the tube diameter has been somewhat relaxed. The degree to which the latter has been relaxed will be determined by the results of an experimental program currently in progress. The new theory is applied to a capped tube with an axial impulsive force applied to the capped end for a short period. Numerical solutions using the method of characteristics are presented for a water-filled copper tube and for two different pulse lengths. An analytical solution is obtained for the special case when the speeds of sound in the tube material and in the fluid are equal and this provides a check on the numerical solution.
Issue Date:1975-11
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 404
1975-6007
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112136
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1975 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

Item Statistics