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Title:Recent results in the phenomenological theory of diffusion in solids
Author(s):Aifantis, Elias C.
Subject(s):Diffusion In Solids
Abstract:We rationalize diffusion in solids on the basis of a differential equation of balance expressing conservation of momentum for the diffusing species. The balance equation contains a tensor, modelling the stress supported by the diffusing species, and a diffusive force vector, modelling the exchange of momentum between the diffusing species and the species of the solid matrix. These two quantities , which are not identified in classical diffusion interpretations, are the basic ingredients of the theory. The effect of state and constitution of interdiffusing materials is reflected in the form of the constitutive equations for the stress and the diffusive force. Within our framework, the main results of classical theories are rigorously derived in a unified manner. New interesting findings are also deduced and their implications are discussed . The applicability of the theory to a variety of problems, ranging from metallurgy to polymer physics and geophysics, is illustrated.
Issue Date:1978-11
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 430
1978-6008
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112166
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:National Science Foundation 78/11 NSF ENG 77 101 76 78/11
Rights Information:Copyright 1978 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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