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Title:Reexamination of some fundamentals and idealizations of plasticity theory
Author(s):Drucker, D.C.
Subject(s):Plasticity Theory
Abstract:Continual refinement in the physical and mathematical understanding of the inelastic behavior of materials has provided interesting new solutions. It also has led to some unrelastic hopes for mathematical forms or idealizations suitable for both a scientifically acceptable synthesis of the complex behavior that is observed and engineering calculations that require only moderate computational effort. Once again, therefore, it is worthwhile to examine the kind of experimental information that is or can be made available, to abstract some essential aspects of material response in a few areas of current interest, to re-assess the postulates of material behavior, and to explore stability of materials and geometry in a broad context. As a start, some special topics are covered briefly: the equivalence of the ''bookkeeping'' information needed for plasticity calculations with and without yield surfaces, the problems of principle involved in the use of Cauchy or "true" stress, the stability of defonning surfaces, the kinking instability of fiber-reinforced canposites, the response of metals to cyclic loading, and the inelastic behavior of materials sensitive to hydrostatic pressure.
Issue Date:1979-12
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 438
1979-6008
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112175
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1979 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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