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Title:Appropriate simple idealizations for finite plasticity
Author(s):Drucker, D.C.
Subject(s):Finite Plasticity
Abstract:Finite elasto-plasticity has become a very lively subject in recent years with much disagreement over proposed methods of taking finite deformations into account in constitutive relations. For good reasons worth recalling, the conventional incremental theory of plasticity does not explicitly include the continuum rotation associated with the shear deformation that is the dominant feature of many problems of practical importance. Yet this simple theory has been replaced in many computer programs and analsyses by mathematical approaches and definitions of isotropic finite elasticity which do. As a consequence, incorrect inferences have been drawn for plastic stress-strain relations in general and for material instability in simple plastic shear in particular. When elastic strains and lattice rotations are negligible, rotation should be taken as zero in incremental plasticity theory no matter how large the continuum rotations computed from the shear displacement field. Presented at the International Symposium Plasticity Today in honor of Professor W. Olszak, Udine, Italy, June 27-30, 1983.
Issue Date:1983-08
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 460
1983-6005
Genre:presentation / lecture / speech
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112199
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1983 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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