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Title:Time dependent two dimensional detonation interaction of edge rarefactions with finite length reaction zones
Author(s):Bdzil, John B.; Stewart, D. Scott
Subject(s):Edge Rarefactions
Finite Length Reaction Zones
Time Dependent Problem
Two Dimensional Detonation
Abstract:A theory of time-dependent two-dimensional detonation is developed for an explosive with a finite thickness reaction zone. A representative initial-boundary value problem is treated that illustrates how the planar shock of an initially one-dimensional detonation becomes nonplanar in response to the action of an edge rarefaction that is generated at the explosive's lateral surface. The solution of this time-dependent problem has a wave-hierarchy structure that at late times includes a weakly two-dimensional hyperbolic region and a fully two-dimensional parabolic region. The wave head of the rarefaction is carried by the hyperbolic region. We show that the shock locus is analytic at the wave head. The dynamics of the final approach to two-dimensional steady-state detonation is controlled by Burgers equation for the shock locus. We also present some results concerning the stability of the solutions to our problems.
Issue Date:1986-01
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 476
1986-6001
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112216
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:Energy Department 86/01; Air Force Off of Scientific Research 86/01
Rights Information:Copyright 1986 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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