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Title:Fatigue strength of nickel base alloy m 252 as influenced by surface finishing methods
Author(s):Morrow, JoDean; Sinclair, G.M.; Ross, A.S.
Subject(s):Fatigue
Nickel
Surface Finshing
Base Alloys
Abstract:Results of fatigue tests on eight sets of a Nickel base alloy, M-252, are reported. Each set was prepared using a different method of surface finishing. The ground specimens were flat plates with rectangular cross-section. All other specimens had circular cross-sections. The mechanically polished and rolled specimens behaved in fatigue as would be expected on the basis of the surface hardness and surface roughness. A large decrease was found in fatigue limit of sets with a ground surface as compared to the mechanically polished or rolled sets. This decrease in fatigue limit is thought to be due in part to tensile residual stresses near the surface and to the difference in the cross-sectional shape of specimens. There may also be some deleterious effect of the grinding on the surface material which is not reflected by the simple surface hardness and surface roughness measurements. No effort is made to quantitatively determine the importance of each of these factors, since some work relevant to this problem is still in progress.
Issue Date:1958-02
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 558
1971-8586
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112288
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:General Electric Company Evendale Plant Lab 58/02
Rights Information:Copyright 1958 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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