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Title:Influence of temperature on creep stress rupture and static properties of melamine resin and silicone resin glass fabric laminates
Author(s):Findley, William N.; Peithman, Harlan W.; Worley, Will J.
Subject(s):Temperature
Creep
Stress-rupture
Melamine Resin
Silicone Resin
Laminates
Abstract:Results of the following tests of melamine-resin glass-fabric laminate and silicone-resin glass-fabric laminate at temperatures up to 400 and 600°F respectively are reported: static tension, static compression, tension creep tests, and time-to-fracture tests. The mechanical properties of both laminates decreased in desirability with increase in temperature as a rule. The creep data supply additional evidence that the percent increase in strain from one given time to another given time (called creepocity) is independent of stress. An analysis of the creep data are represented by an equation which describes the effect of stress, time and temperature. This equation is based on the activation energy theory and a power function of time. An analysis of the data show the possibility that no creep will occur at temperatures below -37°F for the melamine-resin laminate and -108°F for the silicone resin laminate.
Issue Date:1953-08
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 62
1967-0359
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112362
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Contract Number NAW 5517.
Rights Information:Copyright 1953 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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