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Title:Simplified modeling of transition to detonation in porous energetic material
Author(s):Stewart, D. Scott; Prasad, Kuldeep; Asay, Blaine W.
Subject(s):Detonation Transition
Porous Energetic Materials
Abstract:A simplified model that can predict the transitions from deflagration to detonation and shock to detonation is given with the aim of describing experiments in beds of porous HMX. A single-phase state variable theory is adopted in contrast to a two-phase axiomatic mixture theory. The ability of the porous material to compact is treated as an endothermic process. Reaction is treated as an endothermic process. The algebraic (Rankine-Hugoniot) steady wave analysis is given for inert compaction waves and steady detonation waves in a piston supported configuration, typical of the experiments carried out in porous HMX. A structure analysis of the steady compaction wave is given. Numerical simulations of deflagration to detonation are carried out for parameters that describe an HMX-like material and compared with the experiments. The simple model predicts the high density plug that is observed in the experiments and suggests that the leading front of the plug is a secondary compaction wave. A shock to detonation transition is also numerically simulated.
Issue Date:1992-11
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 704
1993-6002
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112391
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1992 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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