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Title:Energy-based localization theory part II effects of diffusion inertia and dissipation numbers
Author(s):Cherukuri, Harishchandra P.; Shawki, Tarek G.
Subject(s):Effects Of Diffusion
Inertia
Dissipation Numbers
Abstract:The basic framework for an energy-based theory of localization in dynamic viscoplasticity was recently developed by Cherukuri and Shawki (1993). In this framework, the total kinetic energy serves as a single parameter for the characterization of the full localization history. A characteristic evolution profile of the kinetic energy was shown to correspond to a localizing deformation. Here, we implement the foregoing characterization of localization towards the imrpoved understanding of the mechanics of shear band formation. In particular, we examine the influence of three primary dimensionless groups on localization. These groups are referred to as the inertia number, the diffusion number and the dissipation number. The limits of applicability of the quasi-static assumption as well as the adiabatic deformation assumption are also addressed. Computational evidence indicate that the dissipation number plays a significant role in determining the material localization sensitivity.
Issue Date:1993-08
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 719
1993-6017
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112408
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:National Science Foundation 93/08
Rights Information:Copyright 1993 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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